127. Maldives: CuttleFish Curry

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The Maldives are a playground for divers, snorkelers and sun worshipers Some of the worlds most picture-perfect beaches can be found with the some of the most exclusive resorts on the planet. Away from the tourist hotspots, the Maldives is known for intriguing Islamic culture and is shaped by centuries of seafaring and trade. However once again there is a downside… The rising sea levels caused by climate change are endangering this paradise-like nation. Since the highest point in the nation is just 2,4 meters above sea level. See the problem if the sea levels continue to rise… they are making preparations though to move the entire population to a new homeland overseas.

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Things you didn’t know about the Maldives:

  • World’s first underwater cabinet meeting was held here. For an island country like the Maldives, drastic climate change and rising level of oceans is a major threat. A number of islands have already been cleared because of the rising waters in the ocean and their interference in freshwater resources. For drawing attention towards the same, Mohamed Nasheed, The President, transferred the cabinet meeting of October 2009 right to the ocean’s bottom.
  • It is an Island that was Formed by an Exiled Indian Prince. Though the exact date is not known, the tentative date was sometime before 269 BC. If legends are to be believed, at that time there was no government. Only a peaceful community who worshiped Sun and Water was living there. It is said that the first real kingdom here was founded by Sri Soorudasaruna Adeettiya, the son of a ruler of Kalinga, a kingdom in India. The king was extremely angry with his son and had sent him away to the Maldives, then called Dheeva Maari. The prince established Adeetta Dynasty in the Maldives.
  • While in most of the countries on the globe, the weekend means Saturday and Sunday, it is not so in the Maldives. Weekend here is Friday and Saturday.
  • Many people of the Maldives hold on to a strong belief in the supernatural, including black and white magic. In September 2013, a coconut was detained by police after being found loitering and acting suspiciously during the presidential elections. The questionable young coconut was found outside of a polling station and was accused of being placed there to rig the election. Coconuts are supposed to be a frequent ingredient in black magic spells and rituals; the police called in a white magician to examine the coconut for threats and curses. No such curses were found, and the magician deemed the coconut to be an innocent.
  • Every element in the Maldives flag is symbolic. The crescent moon stands for Islam, the green section represents palm trees, and the red background symbolizes the blood shed by Maldivian heroes

This curry is spicy, delicious and quick, the perfect weeknight meal

malediven

Ingredients:

  • 250g -300g cuttlefish cut into rings
  • 1 medium onion, finely sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 ” piece ginger
  • 6 curry leaves
  • 1 pandan leaf, cut into large pieces
  • 1 level tsp pureed tamarind
  • 2tsp coriander seeds
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1/2 – 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric
  • 1/4 scotch bonnet or 2 green chilies cut in half lengthwise ( optional)
  • 1/3cup packed coconut milk
  • about 400 ml water
  • oil

1. Heat a dry frying pan over a low heat and once its hot add your coriander seeds and cumin seeds, toast for about 1-2 minutes, don’t let the cumin seeds burn!!!. Pour into a motor and pestle.

2. In to the motor and pestle add the garlic, ginger, chili powder, turmeric along with the roasted spices and pound to a smooth paste using 1-2 tbsps water. you can use an electric grinder for this.

3. In a pot, heat some oil about 2-3 tbsp, add the onions and saute’ till translucent. Stir in curry leaves and pandan leaf.

4. Add the spice paste and stir-fry in the onion mixture for about 1-2 minutes to release the flavors. Add a little water to prevent it from burning.

5. Carefully add the tuna cubes along with the chilies if using. Pour the required amount of water( you and the tamarind. Bring to a boil then simmer, covered for about 8-10 minutes till the fish is cooked through.

6. Stir in coconut milk, cook 1 minute, taste, add salt to taste and switch off heat. If you find it too spicy add a little sugar.

Serve with roti or chappati or any other flatbread or plain cooked rice with a nice salad on the side. Enjoy!

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