126. Malaysia: Char Kway Teow Noodles

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Malaysia Asia’s true melting pot! Muslim Malays, religiously diverse Chinese, and Hindu and Muslim Indians all muddle along with aboriginal groups (the Orang Asli) on Peninsular Malaysia and Borneo’s indigenous people. Each ethnic group has its own language and cultural practices which you can best appreciate through a packed calendar of festivals and a delicious variety of cuisines. Malaysia’s capital Kuala Lumpur is among the most modern and expensive cities in the world, where people taking the helicopter to the mall is a very normal thing to do. On the other hand for many visitors, Malaysia is defined by its equatorial rainforest. Significant chunks of the primary jungle – among the most ancient ecosystems on earth – remain intact, protected by national parks and conservation projects.

Schermafbeelding 2018-08-31 om 23.29.58

Things you didn’t know about Malaysia:

  • Malaysia’s Kuala Kangsar district office is the home of the last surviving rubber tree from the original batch brought by Englishman H.N. Ridley from London’s Kew Gardens in 1877.
  • The Japanese invaded Malaysia on December 6, 1941, the same day they bombed Pearl Harbor. They landed at Khota Baru and stole bicycles in every town they took on their way to Singapore, making the trip in 45 days.
  • Among the Iban community on Malaysia’s Sarawak province, before a newborn baby is named, they are affectionately called ulat (“worm”), irrespective of their gender. When the baby is named, they must be named after a deceased relative, for fear that using a living relative’s name might shorten the baby’s life. When the parents have chosen a few names, rice balls are made, each representing a name. The first rice ball pecked at by a manok tawai (fighting cock) determines the child’s name
  • Traditionally, pregnant Malaysian women may not kill, tie, or mangle anything, for this may result in birthmarks or a deformed baby. They also may not carry fire or water behind their backs or look at anything ugly or frightening.
  • Malaysia’s national drink is teh tarik (“pulled tea”), which is a tea that is thrown across a distance of about 3 feet (1 m) by Mamak men, from one cup to another, with no spillages. The idea is to let it cool down for customers, but it has become a Malaysian art form

These noodles are delicious the sauce is easy and makes it so complex! And the fishcakes were a completely new ingredient to me but so worth the trip to the Asian supermarket! The meal is thrown together in minutes so perfect for a weeknight after a busy day at work!

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Ingredients:

  • Rice noodles
  • vegetable oil
  • 10  prawns/ shrimp, shelled and deveined
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 5 cm / 2″ piece of fried fish cake, sliced thinly 
  • 20 stems garlic chives, cut into 4 pieces
  • 2 1/2 cups bean sprouts
  • sugar snaps cut in strips
  • Coriander
  • Lime
Sauce:
  • 5 tsp dark soy sauce
  • 4 tsp light soy
  • 2 tsp oyster sauce
  • 4 tsp kecap manis / sweet soy sauce

One thought on “126. Malaysia: Char Kway Teow Noodles

    a mindful traveler said:
    September 7, 2018 at 12:37

    Mmmmm, one of my favourite noodle dishes.

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