134. Mexico, Mexico City: Mole Poblano with Smoked Chicken breast

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Mexico City, this megacity is home to nearly 21 million people , which makes it the most populous city in North America. The city was built atop the ruins of the once flourishing Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. Mexico city’s fascinating melting pot reveals itself through its architecture which includes pre-Columbian ruins alongside Mexican-style modernism, and the mix of cultures where tradition happily coexists with the modern culture.

Things you didn’t know about Mexico City:

  • Mexico’s capital is sinking every year. Mexico City was built atop a system of lake beds by its original tribes and expanded by the Aztecs when they took power of the Valley of Mexico. Unlike the Aztecs who created intricate systems of dikes and canals for flood control, the Spanish insisted on draining the lakebed once they got a taste of the work needed to maintain their watery existence. Most of the city’s water today is pumped from its aquifer below the surface and because of the soil’s sandy condition, the city and buildings continue to sink deeper into the muck.
  • North America’s first printing press was used in Mexico City. Mexican Juan Pablo used North America’s first printing press in 1539 and created 35 books with it from that year until the year of his death in 1560. His original workshop has been converted into a musuem and can still be visited in Mexico City’s Centro Historico. The press was brough by Spaniard Juan de Zumárraga in 1539, and originally printed materials for the colonial church and vice royalty.
  • The greener side: Despite its reputation for being super polluted, Mexico City is one of the greenest megacities in Latin America. Part of this distinction has to do with the fact that the Desierto de los Leones, a nearby natural reserve, is included within the city limits as well as the Parque de Chapultepec, which is almost double the size of Central Park.
  • Freshly released from jail by the Cuban Batista government and exiled in Mexico, Fidel and Raul Castro met Ernesto “Che” Guevara in a tiny apartment in Mexico City’s Tabacalera neighborhood for the first time. It was in this apartment and in the Cafe de la Habana in Colonia Sa Rafeal that the three planned their return to Cuba and a revolution that would turn out to be one of the most infamous in world history.

I have looking forward to making Mole for ages! The rich and tasty sauce combined with the smoked chicken! I know the chili’s seem a lot but it’s really not that spicy! I do however recommend lime juice as a topping since it cuts through richness of the sauce.

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133: Mexico, Yucatan: Pollos ala Naranja sanguina

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It has been a while I know, but I have been crazy crazy busy with work, and love and friends. But now I am stuck at home for a while there were no more excuses ofcourse and i have all the time in world.

I will split up Mexico in 4 parts, because it is simply impossible to simply choose 1 dish, and Mexican food is one of my favorites.

Soooo First up is the peninsula of Yucatan. The states of Yucatán, Campeche, and Quintana Roo are all found in the peninsula. Northern sections of neighbouring Belize and Guatemala (haven’t been to Mexico but I have been to Guatemala and Belize, best trip I ever made!) also form part of its expanse. Yucatan is a little different from other parts of Mexico, traditionally it’s a Mayan region, and the signs of that are still very visible, for example Chichén Itzá an incredibly well-preserved Mayan center that was once a major spiritual and economic hub, which is listed as one of the seven wonders of the world. Strangely the entire peninsula has no rivers that run above the ground, but there is a complex network of underground rivers which have formed beautiful caves and underwater sinkholes called cenotes. They are a popular place to swim, snorkle and dive.

Things you didn’t now about Yucatan:

  • The word “Yucatán” may be the result of a misunderstanding. The origins of the word Yucatán are the subject of debate. According to Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés, the name arose from a confusion. Cortés wrote that a Spanish explorer had asked a native what the area was called. Apparently he responded “Uma’anaatik ka t’ann,” which in Mayan means “I do not understand you.” Misunderstanding his response, the Spanish named it Yucatán.
  • The Yucatán is famed for its troubadour music, or trova, which has roots in Cuban and Colombian rhythms. “La Peregrina” (The Pilgrim) is one of the most popular trovassongs. Written by Ricardo Palmerín in 1923, the haunting song was commissioned by the Governor of Yucatán, Felipe Carrillo, for his fiancée, the American journalist Alma Reed. Tragically, the romance was ill-fated. Carrillo was shot dead by a rebel army while Reed was in San Francisco preparing for their wedding.
  • The Yucatán Peninsula is the site of the Chicxulub crater, which was created by an asteroid about 6 to 9 miles (10 to 15 kilometers) in diameter. The impact, which struck around 65 million years ago, caused worldwide climate problems and may have triggered the extinction of the dinosaurs.
  • Yucatan is the worlds top producer of the super spicy habanero pepper

The food of the Yucatán peninsula is distinct from the rest of the country and is based on Mayan food with influences from Cuba and other Caribbean islands, Europe, Asia and Middle Eastern cultures. In this recipe you can most certainly taste the Mediterranean influences.

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132. Mauritania: Pudim d’Avocat

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Mauritania is located in the West African region. both a desert spring and coastal haven. Much of the country is left to its natural state, undisturbed by urban infrastructure. Mauritania has one of Africa’s grandest scenery. If you go to Mauritania as a tourist, keep in mind that a holiday here doesn’t mean big, fancy all inclusive resorts and touring busses ; it means enjoying what Mauritania was naturally blessed with. One of the sites to visit would be Parc National du Banc D’Arguin where millions of migratory birds winter along the coast.

Things you didn’t know about Mauritania:

  • It is not acceptable to eat with or in the presence of one’s in-laws, and eating with the left hand is forbidden.
  • People are expected to slaughter an animal according to the number of wives and the wealth of the husband. At the end of Ramadan and at the sacrificial feast that ends the annual pilgrimage to Mecca, a married man is expected to offer a lamb. The meat must be eaten up within three days or it is thrown away. It is customary to offer an animal in connection with name-giving, initiation, marriage, and funeral ceremonies and when people return from Mecca or other important places. Only circumcised adult men are allowed to slaughter animals.It is not acceptable to eat with or in the presence of one’s in-laws, and eating with the left hand is forbidden.
  • Mauritania is one of the top 10 least visited countries in the world.
  • The capitals name Nouakchott means “place of winds
  • Mauritania has the largest ship graveyard in the world left abandoned by various outsiders that bribed the local officials and nowadays over 300 of them are stranded at the beaches

This avocado pudding is surprisingly light and delicious. It is not overly sweet which i like! I think you can even eat for breakfast on the weekends, instead of an avocado toast :P.

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131. Martinique: Shrimp Acras

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Martinique, aaaah another holiday paradise! Discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1502 on his 4th voyage to the Americas. What else is there to say about this beautiful island in the Caribbean. Columbus must have been swept off his feet by the beauty of this stunning mountainous island with rainforests and magnificent beaches. Nowadays the capital Fort-de-France is a little overcrowded but the north and south of the island is still relatively untouched by tourists. Add this to the joie the vivre of the locals and you’ll understand why everyone loves Martinique.

Things you didn’t know about Martinique:

  • Before the island was named Martinique by Christopher Columbus in 15th June 1502, the island was known as Jouanacaëra-Matinino, a name that comes from the Tainos of Hispaniola to mean ‘mythical island’.
  • Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), the French artist, visited Martinique. Famous works painted on the island include Two Women of Martinique. The island clearly made an impact because in het later works the bright flowers and colours of the island stand out.
  • Martinique is famous for African-French music known as beguine. Beguine was immortalized by Cole Porter in his song Begin the Beguine.

These shrimp fritters are amazing! A perfect appetizer during the summer months with an ice cold beer or glass a rosé. Serve with a slice of lime and don’t forget to salt them afterwards (just like you do with french fries 😉 )

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130. Marshall Islands: Coconut Crème with Fresh Mango and Pineapple

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The Marshall Islands, another country I had never heard of before writing this. Which is not that strange since it has only been independent since 1986. Before that it was under American rule, but they kind of screwed up so when the inhabitants decided they were ready for independence they had to kindly agree to let the Marshallese fend for themselves. What happened you ask?… Well for starters they used Bikini island (Yes guys I know Spongebobs birthplace) as a site for testing atomic bombs. They told the inhabitants of Bikini that they had a calling from God to move away for the sake of worldpeace. For 12 years they regularly bombed the island with nuclear weapons. Nowadays you can take a trip to Bikini Islands (it’s called Nuclear Tourism, are there people who do this?).

The Marshall Islands’s economy is still very intertwined with the US economy, but that kind of makes sense being such a tiny place. The Marshallese call their own country “Jolet Jen Anij” which means “The Gifts from God” The county is made up of 29 coral atolls containing 1100 smaller islands and islets and then 5 solid isolated islands.

Things you did’t know about the Marshall Islands:

  • The Marshall Islands provides the world’s largest sanctuary for sharks, which virtually doubled the protected area for sharks worldwide.
  • The only indigenous land mammal in the Marshall Islands is the Polynesian rat.
  • The trade in copra has been important to the economy of the Marshall Islands. Copra is dried coconut meat. Once the meat of coconut has been dried to make copra, it can be ground or pressed to yield coconut oil. Copra is classed as “dangerous cargo” when in transit as it can spontaneously explode with great force when it is being transported in volume.
  • The society is matrilineal and, therefore, the land is passed down from generation to generation through the mother.
  • Before the missionaries came, all Marshallese people were tattooed. The ceremony was extending over a month, most painful and held to confer beauty and bring honor; it was a rite of passage to man or womanhood and was believed the only attribute to be carried beyond the grave; partaking of religion, it served as well to confirm ties of family and birth. Facial tattooing, intended to conceal the wrinkles of age, was reserved for chiefs – to whom was permitted the richest and most widespread adornment.

This coconut creme is an amazingly rich and delicious dessert. Perfect for a quick summer dessert!

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129. Malta: Mushroom Pastizzi

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Malta, With 3 times more tourists than inhabitants it is a great example of a mass tourism spot. Malta is the ultimate mediterranean holiday in Europe: sun, beaches and cheap liquor. Malta has a really rich history, and the reason for that is mainly due to it’s strategic placement in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea. In the past 7000 years Malta has been a part of many empires and conquered a lot; The Romans, The Arabs, The Knights of St. John, The French, and The British. They all left their mark on the tiny island. The capital of Malta is Valetta a beautiful city that is on the Unesco list and for good reason. On less than 1 km² there are over 300 historical monuments. The most important one is st. Johns Co-Cathedral built by the Knights of St. John, they ruled the island in the 16th century. The Knights of St. John were extremely rich and lived their lives to serve God. The cathedral is covered in gold and it’s all real, none of it paint.

To discover the rest of the island you take the touristy bus ofcourse, but you can also go your own way and hop on one of the local busses. All the public transport busses on the island were imported from Great Britain in 1955.

Malta is also of the best diving spots in Europe. The water is so clear that in some places you can see 30 meters deep, the reefs are beautiful and there a few shipwrecks at the bottom of the see when on a diving tour.

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Things you didn’t know about Malta:

  • During World War I, Malta was also known as the Nurse of the Mediterranean because a large number of wounded soldiers were accommodated on the island.
  •  Malta is devoid of forests and rivers. Yes, you would not find any of these across its seven islands. Malta is mainly made up of limestone, and there are no hills in the country that are higher than 300 meters.
  • You might be surprised to learn that there are more Maltese people in Melbourne, Australia then there are in Malta.

A perfect little handpie to bring for a picknick (i took them to the beach the next day) . Of course you can also eat them immediately. Yummy and delicious, if you leave out the lardons you can make it a vegetarian dish. Please do add a little extra salt if you leave out the bacon.

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128. Mali: Chicken Peanut Stew

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It’s been a while guys I know! So sorry but i have been crazy busy, which is no excuse at all of course. But I hope this epic Chicken Peanut Stew makes it up little 😀

For centuries Mali was a big mighty and rich empire. They used to trade in gold and a lot of the trade routes that traveled through the scorching heat of the Sahara desert led through Mali. At the end of the 19th century, the French colonized Mali, but they barely left any western influences. Since their independence in 1960 is Mali one of the 10 poorest countries in the world. Going to Mali means going back in time, markets with latrines on the side of a road, happy little baby’s running around naked followed by their moms in colorful dresses and hats, potteries with hundreds of pots in different shapes and size for sale, fishermen waiting to make their catch in the Niger river.

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Things you didn’t know about Mali:

  • The bogolanfini cloth, which is made from handcrafted cloth dyed with mud, is produced only in this part of Africa.
  • When Mansa Musa, emperor of the Malian Empire in the early 1300s, made his Mecca pilgrimage, he made Mali famous by bringing with him 12,000 slaves, 60,000 men, 80 camels that each carried between 50 and 30 pounds of gold, and building a mosque every Friday during his journey.
  • Mansa Musa left so much gold to the people along his way, he inadvertently caused inflation in the regions he passed.
  • Historically a lively African intellectual center, Mali’s literary tradition is passed primarily by word of mouth. “Jalises” recite stories or histories of a community by heart.
  • Woman do all the work for the family but they are held in high regard. Women are always consulted, particularly in community decisions, because they symbolize harmony and peace.

This is a good one guys, full of veggies and a lovely rich peanut flavour!!! Plus bonus: a great way to use leftover roast chicken!

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127. Maldives: CuttleFish Curry

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The Maldives are a playground for divers, snorkelers and sun worshipers Some of the worlds most picture-perfect beaches can be found with the some of the most exclusive resorts on the planet. Away from the tourist hotspots, the Maldives is known for intriguing Islamic culture and is shaped by centuries of seafaring and trade. However once again there is a downside… The rising sea levels caused by climate change are endangering this paradise-like nation. Since the highest point in the nation is just 2,4 meters above sea level. See the problem if the sea levels continue to rise… they are making preparations though to move the entire population to a new homeland overseas.

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Things you didn’t know about the Maldives:

  • World’s first underwater cabinet meeting was held here. For an island country like the Maldives, drastic climate change and rising level of oceans is a major threat. A number of islands have already been cleared because of the rising waters in the ocean and their interference in freshwater resources. For drawing attention towards the same, Mohamed Nasheed, The President, transferred the cabinet meeting of October 2009 right to the ocean’s bottom.
  • It is an Island that was Formed by an Exiled Indian Prince. Though the exact date is not known, the tentative date was sometime before 269 BC. If legends are to be believed, at that time there was no government. Only a peaceful community who worshiped Sun and Water was living there. It is said that the first real kingdom here was founded by Sri Soorudasaruna Adeettiya, the son of a ruler of Kalinga, a kingdom in India. The king was extremely angry with his son and had sent him away to the Maldives, then called Dheeva Maari. The prince established Adeetta Dynasty in the Maldives.
  • While in most of the countries on the globe, the weekend means Saturday and Sunday, it is not so in the Maldives. Weekend here is Friday and Saturday.
  • Many people of the Maldives hold on to a strong belief in the supernatural, including black and white magic. In September 2013, a coconut was detained by police after being found loitering and acting suspiciously during the presidential elections. The questionable young coconut was found outside of a polling station and was accused of being placed there to rig the election. Coconuts are supposed to be a frequent ingredient in black magic spells and rituals; the police called in a white magician to examine the coconut for threats and curses. No such curses were found, and the magician deemed the coconut to be an innocent.
  • Every element in the Maldives flag is symbolic. The crescent moon stands for Islam, the green section represents palm trees, and the red background symbolizes the blood shed by Maldivian heroes

This curry is spicy, delicious and quick, the perfect weeknight meal

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126. Malaysia: Char Kway Teow Noodles

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Malaysia Asia’s true melting pot! Muslim Malays, religiously diverse Chinese, and Hindu and Muslim Indians all muddle along with aboriginal groups (the Orang Asli) on Peninsular Malaysia and Borneo’s indigenous people. Each ethnic group has its own language and cultural practices which you can best appreciate through a packed calendar of festivals and a delicious variety of cuisines. Malaysia’s capital Kuala Lumpur is among the most modern and expensive cities in the world, where people taking the helicopter to the mall is a very normal thing to do. On the other hand for many visitors, Malaysia is defined by its equatorial rainforest. Significant chunks of the primary jungle – among the most ancient ecosystems on earth – remain intact, protected by national parks and conservation projects.

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Things you didn’t know about Malaysia:

  • Malaysia’s Kuala Kangsar district office is the home of the last surviving rubber tree from the original batch brought by Englishman H.N. Ridley from London’s Kew Gardens in 1877.
  • The Japanese invaded Malaysia on December 6, 1941, the same day they bombed Pearl Harbor. They landed at Khota Baru and stole bicycles in every town they took on their way to Singapore, making the trip in 45 days.
  • Among the Iban community on Malaysia’s Sarawak province, before a newborn baby is named, they are affectionately called ulat (“worm”), irrespective of their gender. When the baby is named, they must be named after a deceased relative, for fear that using a living relative’s name might shorten the baby’s life. When the parents have chosen a few names, rice balls are made, each representing a name. The first rice ball pecked at by a manok tawai (fighting cock) determines the child’s name
  • Traditionally, pregnant Malaysian women may not kill, tie, or mangle anything, for this may result in birthmarks or a deformed baby. They also may not carry fire or water behind their backs or look at anything ugly or frightening.
  • Malaysia’s national drink is teh tarik (“pulled tea”), which is a tea that is thrown across a distance of about 3 feet (1 m) by Mamak men, from one cup to another, with no spillages. The idea is to let it cool down for customers, but it has become a Malaysian art form

These noodles are delicious the sauce is easy and makes it so complex! And the fishcakes were a completely new ingredient to me but so worth the trip to the Asian supermarket! The meal is thrown together in minutes so perfect for a weeknight after a busy day at work!

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125. Malawi: Chicken Kwasukwasu

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Malawi a country with extreme geographical differences. Desserts, beaches, grasslands that strangely resemble the Scottish Highlands, forests full of exotic wildlife, mountains that are every hiker’s wet dream. Malawi was once dismissed as a safari destination, but all that changed with a lion-reintroduction program at Majete Wildlife Reserve, which is now one of a few worthwhile wildlife-watching destinations nationwide. Also one of the biggest “attractions” in Malawi is the Leper Tree. A hollowed-out baobab tree that became the horrific final resting place of leprosy sufferers. As recently as the 1950s, one particular tribe living in Liwonde suffered an outbreak of leprosy. In order to keep the disease from spreading, individuals were rounded up and led to a giant baobab at the base of Chinguni Hill. According to park guides, the infected individuals – those still living along, with the bodies of the recently dead – were bound and forced into the tree’s hollowed-out trunk and left there for nature to take its course, removed from the rest of the community for the greater good. The “Leper Tree,” as it has become known, remains standing today though it doubles over to one side, and its bark peels and bursts in spots.

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Things you didn’t know about Malawi:

  • In 2013, President Joyce Banda sold the presidential jet and a fleet of 60 luxury cars to feed the poor and fight malnutrition.
  • Lake Malawi has been called the Calendar Lake as it is 365 miles long and 52 miles wide
  • Thirty percent of Malawians have the surname Chirwa, Banda, Piri or Manda.
  • Tobacco accounts for more than 50 percent of Malawi’s exports.
  • Lake Malawi was once called “The Lake of Stars” by the famed Scottish explorer David Livingstone. He named it the Lake of stars because of the way dances across it during the day and how the stars reflect in it. He saw how the lantern lights from the fishermen’s boats resembled the stars at night.
  • Malawi’s Lake Nyasa contains more fish species than any other lake on earth

This chicken is so crispy and fruity and spicy!!! I can’t imagine anyone not liking this! and it’s so easy as well!! Just serve it up with some rice and your good to go!

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