Month: August 2018

125. Malawi: Chicken Kwasukwasu

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Malawi a country with extreme geographical differences. Desserts, beaches, grasslands that strangely resemble the Scottish Highlands, forests full of exotic wildlife, mountains that are every hiker’s wet dream. Malawi was once dismissed as a safari destination, but all that changed with a lion-reintroduction program at Majete Wildlife Reserve, which is now one of a few worthwhile wildlife-watching destinations nationwide. Also one of the biggest “attractions” in Malawi is the Leper Tree. A hollowed-out baobab tree that became the horrific final resting place of leprosy sufferers. As recently as the 1950s, one particular tribe living in Liwonde suffered an outbreak of leprosy. In order to keep the disease from spreading, individuals were rounded up and led to a giant baobab at the base of Chinguni Hill. According to park guides, the infected individuals – those still living along, with the bodies of the recently dead – were bound and forced into the tree’s hollowed-out trunk and left there for nature to take its course, removed from the rest of the community for the greater good. The “Leper Tree,” as it has become known, remains standing today though it doubles over to one side, and its bark peels and bursts in spots.

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Things you didn’t know about Malawi:

  • In 2013, President Joyce Banda sold the presidential jet and a fleet of 60 luxury cars to feed the poor and fight malnutrition.
  • Lake Malawi has been called the Calendar Lake as it is 365 miles long and 52 miles wide
  • Thirty percent of Malawians have the surname Chirwa, Banda, Piri or Manda.
  • Tobacco accounts for more than 50 percent of Malawi’s exports.
  • Lake Malawi was once called “The Lake of Stars” by the famed Scottish explorer David Livingstone. He named it the Lake of stars because of the way dances across it during the day and how the stars reflect in it. He saw how the lantern lights from the fishermen’s boats resembled the stars at night.
  • Malawi’s Lake Nyasa contains more fish species than any other lake on earth

This chicken is so crispy and fruity and spicy!!! I can’t imagine anyone not liking this! and it’s so easy as well!! Just serve it up with some rice and your good to go!

kip malawi.jpg
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124. Madagascar: Godrogrodo (Coconut Vanilla Spice Cake)

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We all know Madagascar from the animation movie but what do we know about the actual country. Madagascar was settled best we can tell around 700 AD by people from what is now Indonesia, later by Africans. In 1895 the French came around and left the French language and a couple of great buildings. When they became independent in 1960 it was sudden and ill-prepared for the big change. Because of political incompetence, most Madagascans live on less then 2$ a day. Madagascar used to be rich in natural resources, they have a lot of things other countries want. I have to stress I am not some crazy nature nut but when 90% of a countries jungles and forests are gone something is really really wrong… Luckily the world finally started waking up and are only now making national parks of the scarce nature that is left on the island.

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Things you didn’t know about Madagascar:

  • Ranavalona I is known by many as Madagascar’s “mad queen”. She started out as the daughter of a commoner, she married the king’s son and when he died, she had the rightful heir murdered, and took the throne herself.  During her reign she was brutal, ridding the country of Christian missionaries, ending agreements with France and England, enslaving many of her own people, and sentencing anyone who defied her to death.
  • 90% of the wildlife is unique to the island.
  • As practicing animists, one of the customs you may still witness today is the funerary tradition of famadihana. Also known as the turning of the bones, this ritual sees Madagascans bring the bodies of their ancestors out of their crypts and dance with them accompanied by music.
  • During the 17th and 18th centuries, the golden age of piracy, the island was a haven for pirates thanks to its multitude of secluded coves and the fact that the land wasn’t owned by a European power. It was the ideal place to stop to repair their ships without drawing attention and find fresh food.

This recipe a delicacy from the coast of Madagascar, the way of cooking is soo different from a regular cake. Luckily I love looooove everything coconut and spiced so this cake was a dream for me.

coconut spice cake

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